LARP and the variety of stories

February 22, 2013 at 1:09 pm Leave a comment

There has been a bit of a delay since my last post.  This is primarily because I’ve been involved in trying out a completely different type of storytelling altogether: LARP.  Namely preparing for the new Profound Decisions LARP, Empire, which has it’s very first event over Easter weekend this year.  As well as trying to get my head around larping (something that my husband has done for years, but I’ve never tried), I’ve also been trying to flesh out my character, contribute to the group backstory and make ALL THE COSTUMES!  Well costumes for myself and Martin anyway, and with the layers we’re wearing that’s quite enough.

For anyone not familiar with larp it stands for Live Action Role Play.  Most people are probably familiar with computer games like World of Warcraft where you play a character (normally fantastical) who goes on quests, gets experience to get new skills (normally in some way magical and/or superpowered) and go beat up lots and lots of enemies.  Larp has some things in common and others not so much.  For a start you’re acting out the character you are playing (hence the need for costumes) and while there is a certain capacity for battles, in theory in a game like Empire, where player-characters aren’t actively trying to kill each other, it should be possible to have a character that doesn’t kill anything at all.  But you still gain experience to spend on abilities and the setting is still fantastical.

The story happens with the interaction between the players and the organisers.  The organisers provide the stimuli (plot) which the players respond to, as their characters would respond, and with the abilities the characters have.  Then there is the interaction between the characters themselves which can generate circumstances that the organisers then have to respond to, building up into a world of combined storytelling…I was going to say “co-operative storytelling”, but I get the impression that the story is rarely developed by people co-operating with each other.  The games last for years and while the organisers may have a vision for certain events that will happen during the life of the story they can’t dictate how the players will react and so the story grows in its own way.

It’s got me thinking about the huge variety of types of stories, and story building, there are out there.

As it happens I’ve also been looking into some of the digital storytelling MOOC’s, mostly ds106: a programme run out of the University of Mary Washington on a regular basis for students there, but also open online to anyone who wants to jump in at any point.  What with my brother-in-law’s wedding and the Empire first event coming up I’m not going to have as much time as I would like to be looking at storytelling over the next few weeks.  Still, I’m hoping that, as I prepare for some low-tech fantasy storytelling, I’ll also to get the chance to delve into some of the more in depth resources ds106 has for enrolled students and find out how making storytelling digital widens out the potential types of stories and story structures you can create.

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Digital storytelling, ds106, Non-digital storytelling. Tags: , , .

Project Story Outlines – Review Story Shapes

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Categories


%d bloggers like this: