Archive for April, 2013

When and why of business storytelling

After my last post I was trying to think of what would go in a project toolkit, and while I still think that’s something I want to explore further, I decided to take a step back and look at when and why someone might want to tell stories in a project/business context.

(Of course there is always “because I’ve been told to put together a story about this”, but that’s not an overly helpful reason).

To get a point across

This could be any point you want to get across clearly with it’s associated context.  A bulletpoint list can get a point across but doesn’t have the framework of a story that really helps the listener really take it on board.
Different types of stories could be applicable for clients, stakeholders, higher ups and to the people who may want to know more about this project in a few year’s time.

To be entertaining/to make people pay attention

What does a story have over a report?  It should be much less dry and soporific, which is great for marketing and anyone who wouldn’t normally be involved in the project (eg a temp giving sickness cover who needs to get caught up quickly).
Also I think telling the story of where you’ve come from and where you’re going could be great for team cohesion.  One of the best project managers I’ve worked with was very good at telling the story of where we were headed in project meetings so that by the end of the meeting everyone felt charged up to work on getting there.  It wasn’t only the vision of the end point, but he very clearly (if with a broad brush) how we were going to get there, by telling it almost as if it had already happened.

To engage stakeholders

I think this deserves a separate category because there are so many potential ways to engage with stakeholders via stories.  Getting them to tell you their story helps them feel heard, and reflecting it back to them through a scenario or use case helps them to feel their input is being taken seriously as well as being a useful tool for helping stakeholders who don’t normally work together to understand each other.
In previous posts I’ve talked about using Kurt Vonnegut’s story shapes and I think that could be a novel way of keeping track of each stakeholder’s journey in the project (how on board they are etc).  I’ve also spoken about interactive stories (either interactive novels or text adventures) which I would love to use in conjunction with stakeholders stories of their own work to help each group understand the other.
Even LARP could have a place in stakeholder engagement, though I don’t know anyone who enjoys roleplaying at work 😛  Getting stakeholders to engage with something different from their normal point of view – either another team, how things will be at the end of the project or some other point of view you want to get across.

This makes me think that any guidance is going to have to cover an awful lot.  And yes, now that you mention it, I am starting to feel out of my depth.

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April 12, 2013 at 2:53 pm 1 comment

Lack of Empire and Story Toolkit

Although I mentioned Empire in one of my previous posts, I’m afraid I don’t have much to report back yet about the wonders of LARP as a storytelling medium.  A bit of a stomach bug and -11 degree temperatures with wind chill in the middle of an open field (ie with lots of chance for the wind to chill) I only actually managed one afternoon of actual roleplay after spending a day setting up.  Luckily the next event is at the end of May which hopefully should be considerably warmer and with less of me being sick.

Meanwhile, I think I’m building up a fairly good case for storytelling as part of project wrap up to be a good idea only if properly supported/managed.  In my previous post I mentioned how creativity takes time, in terms of space to be creative and in terms of time to hone storytelling skills.   Week 5 of ds106 kind of rams that home as it is about how to become a better photographer.  Now there are lots of ways to be creative, and ds106 seems to be encouraging learners to become good at all of them.  Admirable undoubtedly, and for the full time students on the course a worthwhile goal, but anyone who has passions and hobbies outside work knows that you can only cram in so much after day to day work, home, family and friends if you want to have any sleep.

I’ve been coming to the conclusion that it shouls be possible to create a toolkit or something to give people the structures and building blocks required to create quick and dirty stories.  It would need how to tell what your story should be about, help on basic story structure, types of stories, media to create stories in, maybe a couple of very quick creative exercises…

But this idea has got to be too simplistic.  I’ve just been going on about how storytelling takes time and creativity and skill and yet it’s also true that we tell stories all the time – it’s how we’re wired and it’s why they’re so useful as a communication tool.  As long as we’re not looking to create great literature or the next film festival winner it should be possible I think.

I’m going to have a think about how this might be done, but if anyone has any ideas (or thinks it’s a little crazy) I’d love to hear them!

April 9, 2013 at 2:23 pm Leave a comment


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